Third generation reclaimed wood coffee tray

3rd generation reclaimed wood coffee tray, using Funky Junk's Old Sign Stencils and Fusion Mineral Paint | funkyjunkinteriors.net
I think it’s pretty safe to say, I am a true blue repurpose-aholic. I just took a quick look around my home, attempting to spot something brand new. The only thing I could pinpoint were the kitchen cupboards, fireplace, kitchen island, and stairway rails.

But even with those, they were designed to have a repurposed, well loved, old world feel. So, I’m a believer that it can be done with new materials!

But for things I’m capable of doing myself, I do prefer authentically repurposed where applicable. In fact, some of my DIY projects are so repurposed, they come with their own salvaged junk family tree!

Meet, a third generation reclaimed wood coffee tray. 🙂

vintage trunk with wood strips across top and monogram patch | funkyjunkinteriors.net
I was needing a new top for this old trunk coffee table / ottoman.

reclaimed wood white washed DIY barn door styled gate for a fireplace mantel | funkyjunkinteriors.net

But this tray has quite a past! (don’t we all?)

It first became a rustic gate for my fireplace mantel way back.

Pipe handled bedtray in a white rustic bedroom with horse gate headboard | funkyunkinteriors.net
How to make a pipe handled bed tray with reclaimed wood | funkyjunkinteriors.net
When I no longer desired to have the gate around, it was taken apart, and made into this pipe bed tray.

But as time went on, I stopped using the tray in the bedroom, and those pipes and wood were calling my name for other projects.

And this is why I wrote the post, “why I build with screws”.

3rd generation reclaimed wood coffee tray, using Funky Junk's Old Sign Stencils | funkyjunkinteriors.net

3rd generation reclaimed wood coffee tray, using Funky Junk's Old Sign Stencils | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Which brings us to today!

Not only is the tray perfect for a top for a trunk that has seen better days, I can still carry it into the bedroom if desired too! With a much lighter weight version this round.

But what mades this tray super extra special unique, are all those random painted markings, thanks to a previous life, wouldn’t you agree?

Here’s how I made the reclaimed wood coffee tray:

– – –

My fav things supply list: some contain Amazon affiliate links

reclaimed wood

stencil brush

rustic hardware

miter saw

cordless drill

National Coffee stencil from Funky Junk’s Old Sign Stencils

Fusion Mineral Paint – Coal Black


– – –

1. Cut 3 slats of wood to desired length.

2. Cut 2 slats of wood for end supports, to the full depth of the tray.

3. Attach with screws from the top.

4. Add funky handles.

5. Stencil if desired.

That. Is. It! Never again do you ever have to buy a fancy tray. Just make your own in minutes. And the bonus is, you can custom make any size you like. With any design you wish. Great, useful gift idea too.

So here’s a few tips to make your DIY tray extra special…

3rd generation reclaimed wood coffee tray, using Funky Junk's Old Sign Stencils and Fusion Mineral Paint | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Adding a design:

Stencilling on a design makes something plain tell more of a story. And hopefully makes it look like you’ve used random wood planks from an old sign.

In this case, I used the National Brewers Coffee stencil from my own collection.

3rd generation reclaimed wood coffee tray, using Funky Junk's Old Sign Stencils and Fusion Mineral Paint | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Working with the slats:

When I stencil on top of several joined planks, I align the stencil to work around that, avoiding stencilling across the joins if possible.

3rd generation reclaimed wood coffee tray, using Funky Junk's Old Sign Stencils and Fusion Mineral Paint | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Paint used:

This round, I used Fusion Mineral Paint’s Coal Black. This stuff goes on with a beautiful matte finish, which is reminiscent to old signs of course, and dries nearly instantly.

You can find a retailer that carries the paint HERE.

(disclosure: I’m part of a blogging program that LOVES to creates with this paint. No hardship here!)

rustic hardware layered for extra eye candy on this reclaimed wood coffee tray with Funky Junk's Old Sign Stencils | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Junking up that eye candy factor:

For extra junk factor, I like to layer washers underneath the handles. The more random, the better.

antique kettle holding lavender, on a reclaimed wood coffee tray with Funky Junk's Old Sign Stencils | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Chiming decor in with the theme:

This old kettle filled with dried lavender is really the perfect companion to a coffee tray, don’t you think? Any old kettle would also be completely adorable.

And this is why I give permission to go forth and collect whatever you love. You’ll ‘eventually’ use it for something, right?? 

Rustic farmhouse living room with reclaimed wood trunk coffee table and old barn gate styled window treatement screens | funkyjunkinteriors.net
3rd generation reclaimed wood coffee tray, using Funky Junk's Old Sign Stencils and Fusion Mineral Paint | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Window gate screen tutorial HERE

So for today, let’s have coffee!

But my inquisitive mind can’t help but to wonder… “What free, useful thing will you become next?”

Because some things will never change…

– – – – –

Do you take your creations apart too in order to rebuild something?

Funky Junk's Old Sign Stencils store - click here for direct visit
Click to see more Funky Junk's Old Sign Stencils projects!

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Categories: All Cool Projects, DIY, Junk Drawer, Old Sign Stencils, Reclaimed wood projects, Signs
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  1. Oh Donna, thanks for the command, ‘Go forth and collect!’ Love it and it’s a motto I live by. I appreciate your directions for putting the tray together. It doesn’t get any easier. Maybe I could make some for Christmas gifts. And I appreciate you pointing out that the washers can be different. I know, I know, I’m a little slow and tend to have tunnel vision. And then when I see you have an item put together with washers that are different, I feel like I’ve been released to experiment. I think I need to practice thinking outside of the box a little more, wouldn’t you say! Again, thank you for the post. Your posts are a ray of light in a day(especially a rainy one here).

  2. I do take stuff apart and turn it into something else. Love this old trunk as a coffee table. I do a lot of that with some of our farm wood projects because things change and repairs happen here and there. I have my eye on the historic Route 66 – thinking of something fun but I can’t seem to narrow it down.

  3. Good morning, Donna

    You are so good at what you do! Everything blends so well. I usually only take things apart when they don’t go together right or to my liking the first time. I loved the tray but also noticed the window screen or cover, or decoration to the right of the window. That is awesome also. Thank you for your post and your excellent directions for the tray.