My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips

My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips, while working on a boy's bedroom | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Well, what a difference a gallon of paint and a few hours makes!

boy's bedroom before with very blue ceiling
Here’s the very blue before I told you about in THIS post.

White ceiling after - part of My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips, while working on a boy's bedroom | funkyjunkinteriors.net
White ceiling after - part of My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips, while working on a boy's bedroom | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Aaaaand, here’s the AFTER!

As you can see, I was so excited about getting this completed, I snapped pics while the paint was still wet.

But no matter… it covered fabulously.

And look how much brighter and softer the other colours look!

I realize painting a ceiling is a pretty standard thing, but I thought I’d share some of my best painting gear and tips regardless, in case there’s an aha moment or two in it for you.

I don’t know about you, but I love digging into the whys on what people use and do. I always learn at least one valuable tip, and that makes my read worthwhile every time.

Painting gear - part of My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips, while working on a boy's bedroom | funkyjunkinteriors.net
What I use for painting a ceiling
(the below contains some Amazon affiliate links)

good quality ceiling paint

roller with a thicker nap

paint tray and liner

roller handle

broom handle or roller extender

quality paint brush

small container

wet rags

old sheet drop cloth

plastic wrap

my fav stepladder

plastic work tables

The standing platform aluminum stepladder - part of My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips, while working on a boy's bedroom | funkyjunkinteriors.net
A short ladder with a standing platform.

This type of stepladder is the bomb!

I borrowed a good friend’s for a number of years, but when I realized it was officially living at my house (sorry Dan!), I vowed to be on the lookout for my own.

I love this ladder, because you can actually stand comfortably on it without worrying about balancing on a rung. And the handle is so handy to help steady yourself. Two features you don’t get with a regular ladder. I feel they are safer than a regular stepladder myself, especially if balancing is an issue.

These are also super lightweight, and collapse like a dream. Treat yourself, and put this one on your must get list. They are so nice for changing out lightbulbs too!

Find a similar stepladder on Amazon HERE

Old sheet drop cloth - part of My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips, while working on a boy's bedroom | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Old sheet drop cloth - part of My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips, while working on a boy's bedroom | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Old sheet drop cloth.

Who else votes for the good ‘ol sheet as a drop cloth? I love 100% cotton vintage ones, because they wear like metal, and have more body to them.

I find sheets the best, because they are large enough to cover something only once, yet compact enough to crumple into the tightest spots.

I wash them every so often, but only after the paint has completely dried on them.
.

Small container with brush for cutting in

When I use to work with a faux painting artist, his #1 rule was to always pour paint OUT of a can into something else, so you don’t contaminate the gallon, nor muck up the rim.

All true, but my #1 reason for pouring some paint into a smaller container is so I can climb up and down the ladder easier, and move around quicker.

Broom handle roller extender - part of My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips, while working on a boy's bedroom | funkyjunkinteriors.net
A broom handle extender.

I have purchased expensive, telescoping handles before for rollers. But they have always at some point broken.

A broom handle is perfect, and since you already have one or several on hand… 

Covering a roller in plastic wrap - part of My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips, while working on a boy's bedroom | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Liners, plastic wrap and baggies.

I personally don’t like washing out rollers and brushes. So I avoid or delay the task where I can.

Such was the case with this roller. I knew I wanted to belt out the ceiling over 2 days, so I didn’t bother washing out the roller. Rather, plastic wrap tightly sealed around the roller part had it working perfectly the next day.

But there is a caveat when using plastic wrap. The nap compact. This roller had a thicker pile for ceiling painting. If you don’t wash the roller in between coats, you kind of loose that special quality, and the roller acts more like a regular one. 

I’d still rather risk a few drips than wash out a roller though! ๐Ÿ™‚

I also don’t always wash out the rollers once a larger project is complete. The roller may be spent, and they never seem to come out the same again, so purchasing the rollers by bulk kinda takes care of that. 

But honestly, my #1 reason for not washing out rollers is because the silly things dry on me! That’s when I end up pounding them off the handle by smacking it with a hammer. 
.

Protecting brushes with baggies

Brushes I do wash daily, but if I’m using the brush several times throughout one day, I’ll cheat and place the brush part inside a sandwich baggie. But just keep an eye on it, because at some point, they can get too gummed up to continue to work their best.

I’ve done the fridge \ freezer route before, but didn’t find it made a difference. Plus, it stunk up my freezer and food. ๐Ÿ™‚
.

Liners

Probably not good for the landfills, but I’m a liner-aholic. There was a time I use to wash them out, but they generally dry out on me. If you make sure they are left relatively clean, you can actually reuse them again with the same colour. Just be careful to not chip up the old paint.

My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips, while working on a boy's bedroom | funkyjunkinteriors.net

Collapsable plastic work table

Notice that the massive TV is already gone?! This gave me the perfect work table surface at standing level!

I love these tables, because they are so easy to clean, and are super sturdy. Plus… you can collapse them when not needed.

The above one was from Costco a few years back. I think they still have them or perhaps similar with a fold in the middle. I haven’t been there in awhile to check.

How to cut in the edges and roll the paint on - My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips, while working on a boy's bedroom | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Technique

Edges first, then roll is my method.

Since edging requires a ladder and the rolling doesn’t (if using a broom handle), I like to edge a section first, then follow it with rolling.

Working against a wet edge is preferable, so doing small sections at a time works well.

That said, you’ll find a brush adds more paint than a roller. So edging twice alongside 3-4 rolled coats seemed to be nearly equal in coverage. So adjust accordingly.

You’ll also notice I wasn’t careful about hitting the wall. Since the walls will be painted anyway, that’s where I will be careful with cutting in. I just make sure I swipe the brush against the wall, to remove any drips or bumps.

When I do the walls, I’ll show you my cool cutting in trick I learned from a professional painter. You won’t need masking tape for this one!

My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips, while working on a boy's bedroom | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Pattern or random?

Since my room was crammed with stuff, I didn’t worry about working with a perfect pattern, but I attempted where I could. More important than pattern, was rolling against a wet edge when possible.

If you are working with a smooth ceiling, application will be a little fussier, pattern wise. I’d paint along one entire edge of the ceiling, then work towards the other side, zig zag style.
.

Take a walk

Tip: I like to walk around the entire room after I feel it’s done, and spy the ceiling from all angles. The light hits the surface differently, depending where it’s coming from, which will help you notice missed spots.
.

Clean as you go.

While I do my best to move the drop sheet around where the painting is being done, some drips will inevitably land on the floor.

So after a ceiling section is done, I wash down the floor with a slightly soapy wet rag, directly beneath where I’ve been painting, before moving on. This captures any fresh drips right away before they do actual damage.

Bring out decorating elements before you are done - My favorite ceiling painting gear and tips, while working on a boy's bedroom | funkyjunkinteriors.net
And last but not least, bring out a few pretties while you work so you are encouraged to keep going! Do you do this too? ๐Ÿ™‚

I’m just giddy this room is seeing some progress!

Now, excuse me while I go find another drop sheet to cover a 5 foot pink ape… ๐Ÿ™‚

.
So… did I miss anything? Any ceiling painting tips you love using?

How to plank a bathroom popcorn ceiling | funkyjunkinteriors.net
Here’s another post I did awhile back on how to plank a popcorn ceiling. Don’t even tempt me… ๐Ÿ™‚

Visit more boy’s room progress posts HERE

Facebook Pinterest Twitter Google+ RSS

Categories: Junk Drawer
Tags: ,
11

Post a comment!

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  1. Informative post Donna! I think you covered it all pretty well. I too hate to wash out rollers but have been known to. Mine usually stay on and get rock hard and then I have to smash it to get it off! LOL! And sheets are great for placing under a painting job. When done, just roll up. Presto! Enjoying the progress. Making some of my own. Have a wonderful day!

  2. Donna you are so right, if you have an open mind and want to learn all you can you can always learn something new about anything even if it is something you have been doing for years. I have just got to get a step ladder like yours, where did you find your ladder?

  3. Ceilings are the toughest for me. I have a wall in my dining area that needs painting and I keep putting it off. Your line “in a few hours” helps me to get motivated. I keep thinking it will take too long and I have too many art projects to get done to put in the gallery I am part of as it is the selling season but realizing it is really only a few hours tells me I can get it done. I love those step ladders and have getting one on my list, they are so very handy!
    I too buy the paint rollers in bulk, it saves so much time in the long run and water, if you think about it, getting one roller clean takes a lot of water.

  4. I agree with all of the above. I also discovered that if you buy good roller covers with a plastic core, rather than cardboard, you can throw them into the washing machine! I’ve used both top and front loaders and they both worked great. I toss the roller covers in, put detergent in the soap compartment and softener in the softener dispenser. They come out soft, fluffy, and clean for the next painting session with no crusty end where you set it up to dry after hand-washing. ๐Ÿ˜Š

  5. One more thing…there is ceiling paint that goes on pink or purple and dries totally white. It works great to help you make sure you don’t miss any spots. HOWEVER, the paint depth guy gave me a tip: only use it in bedrooms and living rooms and such. If you use color changing paint in the kitchen or bathroom, moisture from steam can cause the color to come back until it dries again. ๐Ÿ˜‚

  6. Awesome tips! Instead of plastic wrap over the paint try & roller, I use one of those white 13 gallon kitchen garbage bags. That way when you’re done for the day or a couple hours, slide the whole tray (roller and all) into the plastic bag and gently pull it closed or just tuck the open side of the bag back under the tray. You don’t have to lay the bag into the paint or on the roller. The roller stays wet and no skin forms on the paint in the tray! I really hate painting, but rooms seem to look sooooo much better after a new coat of paint!